Idaho Woodpecker – 15 Best Species

The Idaho woodpecker is a small bird found throughout the state of Idaho. This woodpecker is a member of the family Picidae, which includes members like the chickadee and nuthatch. This woodpecker is one of the smallest members of its family and has a length of about 12 inches; it uses a long pointed bill to extract insects from trees.

Table of Contents

Idaho Woodpecker Best Species:

Woodpeckers are some of the most common birds in Idaho. They can be found throughout the state, but a few specific woodpecker species live in Idaho.

The Pileated Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

The Pileated Woodpecker is a common bird in many parts of the United States. The Pileated Woodpecker is a large Idaho Woodpecker with a wingspan of up to 3 feet. The Pileated Woodpecker is primarily brown with white markings on its head, neck, and breast.

The Pileated Woodpecker is found in many parts of Idaho, including the Boise Foothills and the Salmon River Valley. The Pileated Woodpecker is usually seen in open habitats such as wooded hillsides and forests but has been known to live in urban areas.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: DryocopusPileatus
• Length: 15.8- 3 in
• Weight: 8.8 – 12.3 oz
• Wingspan: 26 – 30 in

Lewis’s Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

Lewis s Woodpecker, toucanet, is a medium-sized woodpecker found in the Pacific Northwest and northwestern California. The male has a deep red head and neck, while the female has a more olive-green head and neck. The bill is black with white stripes, and they have bright yellow legs and feet.

They inhabit areas of moist coniferous forest, including Douglas fir, Western hemlock, Sitka spruce, and Pacific yew. They forage insects on trees and take down small mammals such as mice or voles.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: Melanerpes Lewis
• Length: 10.2 – 11.0 in
• Weight: 3.1 – 4.9 oz
• Wingspan: 19.3 – 20.5 in

White-Headed Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

The white-headed Woodpecker is a common sight in Idaho, and for a good reason. This large bird can be seen throughout much of the state, from the high desert to the forests near the Cascades. While uncommon in urban areas, they can often be found around bird feeders.

White-headed woodpeckers are social birds and often gather in groups of up to 20 individuals. They are mainly insectivores but will also eat small mammals and fruit.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: PicoidesAlbolarvatus
• Length: 8.3 – 9.1 in
• Weight: 1.9 – 2.3 oz
• Wingspan: 16.9 in

Downy Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

Downy woodpeckers are common in many parts of the United States but are especially abundant in Idaho. These birds are known for their distinctive laugh-like pecks, and they can be found pecking away at trees all over the state.
Downy woodpeckers were once considered an endangered species, but their population has grown thanks to conservation efforts significantly.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: PicoidesPubescens
• Length: 5.5 – 6.7 in
• Weight: 0.7 – 1.0 oz
• Wingspan: 9.8 – 11.8 in

Hairy Woodpecker-Idaho Woodpecker

Idaho Woodpecker

The hairy Woodpecker is a common woodland bird in much of North America. The male has a thick, black facial mask and a conspicuous white stripe down the back of his head. The female is primarily brown with a few patches of black and lacks the white stripe on the back of her head.

Both sexes have long, dark feathers on their heads and necks, giving them a characteristic appearance. They are omnivorous birds that eat insects, nuts, berries, and seeds.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: PicoidesVillosus
• Length: 7.1 – 10.2 in
• Weight: 1.4 – 3.4 oz
• Wingspan: 13.0 – 16.1 in

Northern Flicker:

Idaho Woodpecker

Northern Flickers are small, colourful birds in many parts of the United States. The Northern Flicker is a migratory bird and typically spends the winter in the southern part of the United States. However, they have been known to migrate northward into Idaho.

Northern Flickers prefer forests with lots of trees and shrubs. They feed on insects and spiders caught in the air or ground. Northern Flickers are very social birds and usually live in pairs or families.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: ColaptesAuratus
• Length: 11.0 – 12.2 in
• Weight: 3.9 – 5.6 oz
• Wingspan: 16.5 – 20.1 in

Red-Naped Sapsucker:

Idaho Woodpecker

The red-naped Sapsucker is a common bird in the lower 48 states but is less well-known in Idaho. The population here is thought to be stable, but there are fewer sightings of this bird than in other parts of the country.

The red-naped Sapsucker is a small, sparrow-sized bird with a red cap and nape. It feeds mostly on insects but will also take small birds or mammals if it can catch them. This bird prefers wooded areas with plenty of trees and shrubs for nesting and is generally shy and difficult to see.

They are good indicators of healthy forest ecosystems because they feed almost entirely on insects. They help keep populations of insect pests low, which benefits both people and nature.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: SphyrapicusNuchalis
• Length: 7.5 – 8.3 in
• Weight: 1.1 – 2.3 oz
• Wingspan: 16.1 – 16.9 in

Red-Breasted Sapsucker:

The red-breasted Sapsucker (Sphyrapicusrubicundus) is a common bird in the United States. This Woodpecker is found in the Western and Eastern United States and Canada. The red-breasted Sapsucker is mainly found in deciduous trees, such as oak and ash.

The red-breasted Sapsucker feeds mainly on insects but will also eat small birds and mammals. The red-breasted Sapsucker has a perfect sense of sight, which allows it to find food above the ground.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: SphyrapicusRuber
• Length: 7.9 – 8.7 in
• Weight: 1.9 – 2.2 oz
• Wingspan: 14.6 – 16.0 in

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker:

Idaho Woodpecker

The yellow-bellied sapsucker is a common woodpecker in Idaho. The species is distributed throughout much of the western United States, but its compact distribution in Idaho may indicate that this bird has had some recent population decline. Yellow-bellied sapsuckers are cavity nesters using natural and artificial cavities in trees.

The birds feed on insects and other small creatures found in these holes. The yellow-bellied sapsucker has a green back and breast with a white belly, and its head is black with a bright yellow stripe across its cheeks. It has strong legs and claws for pecking wood and for climbing trees. The yellow-bellied sapsucker is found in most of Idaho except for portions of the Snake and Salmon Rivers drainage basins.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: DryocopusPileatus
• Length:15.8- 3 in
• Weight: 8.8 – 12.3 oz
• Wingspan:26 – 30 in

Williamson’s Sapsucker:

Williamson’s Sapsucker is a small passerine bird that ranges throughout the western United States and northwestern Mexico. The species is closely related to the Yellow-headed Sapsucker, and the two are often considered conspecific.
The Williamson’s Sapsucker is typically found in coniferous or mixed forests but has been known to occur near open woodland edges. It feeds on insects, particularly Lepidoptera larvae, and can be seen darting around the higher branches of its prey item.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: SphyrapicusThyroideus
• Length: 8.3 – 9.8 in
• Weight: 1.6 – 1.9 oz
• Wingspan: 17 in

Red-Bellied Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

One red-bellied Woodpecker can be found in Idaho. This bird is a federally endangered species protected under the Endangered Species Act. This Woodpecker is mainly brown with a red belly. It has a long pointed bill and black feathers on its head.

The red-bellied Woodpecker lives in fir and ponderosa pine forests across much of western North America. They are usually found in trees but can also be found on the ground. They eat insects, nuts, and fruit.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: MelanerpesCarolinus
• Length: 9.4 in
• Weight: 2.0 – 3.2 oz
• Wingspan: 13.0 -1 6.5 in

Red-Headed Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

The red-headed Woodpecker is a common sight in Idaho. This bird is primarily seen in the highlands but has also been spotted in many other parts of the state. The red-headed Woodpecker is a medium-sized bird with a long tail. It has a red head and neck and a black back and wings. The red-headed Woodpecker is an exciting bird because it has two different colour patterns on its head.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: MelanerpesErythrocephalus
• Length: 7.5 – 9.1 in
• Weight: 2.0 – 3.2 oz
• Wingspan: 16.5 in

Acorn Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

The Acorn Woodpecker is a small, brown, white woodpecker found in northern Idaho. The bird is most common in the Salmon-Challis National Forest but can also be found in other parts of the state.
The Acorn Woodpecker is a small bird that measures just over two inches long and has a wingspan of just over four inches. It eats insects, smaller birds, and nests in tree cavities or on the ground.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: MelanerpesFormicivorus
• Length: 7.5 – 9.1 in
• Weight: 1.4 – 3.4 oz
• Wingspan: 13.0 – 16.1 in

Black-Backed Woodpecker:

Idaho Woodpecker

The Woodpecker, also known as the black-backed Woodpecker, is a bird found in North America. The bird is commonly found in the western United States and parts of Canada. The Woodpecker is a medium-sized bird that has a wingspan of about.

It has a black back and white wings. The head and neck are red with a black stripe down its back. The male Woodpecker has a taller bill than the female Woodpecker.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: PicoidesArcticus
• Length: 9.1 in
• Weight: 2.1 – 3.1 oz
• Wingspan: 15.8 – 16.5 in

American Three-Toed Woodpecker:

The American Three-Toed Woodpecker is a small woodpecker found in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. This bird is classified as a threatened species by the IUCN, and it is essential to protect its habitat.

The American Three-Toed Woodpecker prefers to live in areas with many trees and shrubs, but it can also be found in open areas near water. This bird has a long bill, which it uses to eat insects and other small creatures.

Specification:

• Scientific Name: PicoidesDorsalis
• Length: 9.1 in
• Weight: 2.1 – 3.1 oz
• Wingspan: 15.8 – 16.5 in

Final Words:

The Idaho Woodpecker is a bird that is hard to miss. They are common in the state and are known for their impressive beaks and tail feathers. These birds are essential to the ecosystem, as they help feed other animals. Check out your Local Park or nature reserve to see one of these fascinating creatures.

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